2017 Reading Challenge Update - End of April

I finished up a couple of books over the last 2 weeks for The List: 

For week 46, a time travel novel: Valley of the Moon by Melanie Gideon.  I'm not exactly sure how I missed this was a time travel novel from the description - but it is.  I thought it was going to be a historical fiction about Jack London's ranch in early 20th century California.  And it sort of is, but not really.  Some interesting themes of loss and time and place, but you know what? I didn't love this book as much as I thought I would (even after I figured out it wasn't the genre I thought it was).  If you like time travel, I'd stick with The Time Traveller's Wife or maybe Somewhere in Time.  It'd probably be a good summer reading choice.  It's pretty light fare all told. 

For week 7, a book with an animal on the cover/in the title: The Tiger's Wife by Tea Obreht.  At the risk of completely stealing someone else's thunder, let me share a review from Goodreads about this book with you:

Currently knee deep into this book, and it took me a while to really understand it and get into it. Not very interesting at first, didn't capture my attention. After giving it several chances I'm finally trying to finish just to get it over with. Not a book i recommend,but it has good writing and lots of hype. All in all, i still dont understand the point of the book?

I did finish it, but the above pretty much sums it up for me.  This book wandered - a LOT.  Was it a fable? Was it supposed to be some kind of political-themed story?  Was it supposed to be about family?  Or Life and Death (yes, in capitals).  I dunno.  I read it but I'm still not sure I know what it was about, or even how to describe it.  There are some fantasy/fairy-tale type elements.  There's a story about a girl and her grandfather.  There's a story (and back story) about politics and war (which may or may not be something like the Serbian crisis - hard to tell as the story doesn't ever really indicate where it takes place, except sort of generally Russia/Europe/Asia.)

Moving on to a book for week for week 4: A title that doesn't contain the letter "E":  4 3 2 1.  I just started this, so I don't have really anything to say about it yet.  It sounds intriguing and I'm hoping it lives up to the "astonishing, a masterpiece" label it's been given.  (I am always sort of wary of that kind of review.)



The 2017 List
1. A book from the Goodreads Choice Awards 2016
2. A book with at least 2 perspectives (multiple points of view): Some Kind of Fairy Tale by Graham Joyce.
3. A book you meant to read in 2016
4. A title that doesn't contain the letter "E":  4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster.
5. A historical fiction
6. A book being released as a movie in 2017:  Olive Kitteredge by Elizabeth Strout. 
7. A book with an animal on the cover or in the title: The Tiger's Wife by Tea Obreht.
8. A book written by a person of color
9. A book in the middle of your To Be Read list:
10. A dual-timeline novel: The Girl Who Came Home by Hazel Gaynor.
11. A category from another challenge: Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier.
12. A book based on a myth:  Summerlong by Peter Beagle.
13. A book recommended by one of your favorite authors
14. A book with a strong female character: The Ornatrix by Kate Howard.
15. A book written or set in Scandinavia (Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Iceland)
16. A mystery
17. A book with illustrations:  Prairie Girl by Laura Ingalls Wilder.
18. A really long book (600+ pages)
19. A New York Times best-seller
20. A book that you've owned for a while but haven't gotten around to reading
21. A book that is a continuation of a book you've already read
22. A book by an author you haven't read before:  The Secrets of Wishtide, by Kate Saunders.
23. A book from the BBC "The Big Read" list (
link)
24. A book written by at least two authors
25. A book about a famous historical figure
26. An adventure book
27. A book by one of your favorite authors
28. A non-fiction
29. A book published outside the 4 major publishing houses (Simon & Schuster; HarperCollins; Penguin Random House; Hachette Livre) - check all the editions
30. A book from Goodreads Top 100 YA Books (
link)
31. A book from a sub-genre of your favorite genre
32. A book with a long title (5+ words, excluding subtitle):  I Shall Be Near to You by Erin McCabe.
33. A magical realism novel: The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman.
34. A book set in or by an author from the Southern Hemisphere
35. A book where one of the main characters is royalty
36. A Hugo Award winner or nominee (
link)
37. A book you choose randomly
38. A novel inspired by a work of classic literature
39. An epistolary fiction
40. A book published in 2017
41. A book with an unreliable narrator: His Bloody Project by Graeme McRae Burnet.
42. A best book of the 21st century (so far)
43. A book with a chilling atmosphere (scary, unsettling, cold):  Black Rabbit Hall by Eve Chase.
44. A recommendation from "What Should I Read Next" (
link)
45. A book with a one-word title: Uprooted by Naomi Novik.
46. A time travel novel:  Valley of the Moon by Melanie Gideon.
47. A past suggestion that didn't win (
link)
48. A banned book
49. A book from someone else's bookshelf
50. A Penguin Modern Classic - any edition
51. A collection (e.g. essays, short stories, poetry, plays) : Beyond the Woods; Fairy Tales Retold by Paula Guran.
52. A book set in a fictional location

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